Four times as many Canadians say Afghan mission had positive impact on world peace, security than negative

Four times as many Canadians say Afghan mission had positive impact on world peace, security than negative

March 13, 2014 – Polling numbers from Angus Reid Global (ARG) show far more Canadians feel their country’s 12 year mission to Afghanistan had a positive impact on world peace and security than those who see the impact as negative.

As the mission formally ended in Kabul yesterday, ARG asked 1507 Canadian adults a single question: “All things considered, would you say Canada’s mission in Afghanistan had a positive impact on world peace and security, a negative impact, or no impact at all?”

Canada’s involvement in Afghanistan was prompted by the 9/11 attacks that shook global feelings of peace and security. Over the course of a decade, Canada’s presence in Afghanistan resulted in the deaths of 162 Canadians, including 158 soldiers. More than 2000 military personnel were wounded.

Just over one-third of Canadians (35%) said the mission had a positive impact on world peace and security. This sentiment was highest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (48%) and Alberta (42%), and lowest in Quebec (28%).

Most Canadians (42%) felt the investment of troops and public dollars had no impact on world peace and security, with Quebecers (47%) and British Columbians (42%) feeling most strongly about this. Atlantic Canadians (37%) were least inclined to feel this way. Canadians aged 55+ feel this way more strongly.

Fewer than ten per cent say the Canadian mission had a negative impact on world peace and security (8%). These sentiments were highest regionally in Quebec and Ontario. 15 per cent of Canadians said they aren’t sure about the mission’s impact.

These numbers should not be interpreted as indicative of support or opposition to the efforts of Canadian troops on the ground, of the mission’s impact on Afghanistan specifically.

Full Report, Detailed Tables and Methodology


Tags assigned to this article:
AfghanistanMiddle EastWorld Peace

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